Vision Part 4: An Inclusive and Resilient Community

26. Create and support the development of quality community spaces to facilitate social interaction within the community

    • Community centre is hub of community; renewed strength and pride in community; civic pride; more activities for retirees in centre of town; active living

27. Embrace the wider community, including the rural and waterfront areas outside the village proper

    • Virtual gathering spot (website/social media) as community builder to help connect with youth and cottagers

28. Support recreational assets and programs that reduce social isolation of vulnerable members of the community

    • Active citizenship; thriving volunteerism and events; community is caring and supportive; youth-oriented activity; more variety of kids’ recreation; acknowledge home improvement and maintenance;

    • Expand opportunities for youth activities, participation and contribution.

29. Develop public infrastructure on the basis of universal design to support a wide range of users/abilities

    • improved mobility and support for active living; electric car charging stations; better bus connections to bigger centres; lighted path from Kin Park to village; sidewalks in good repair and accessible; school with daycare attached; splash pad

30. Share ideas and resources across community groups, service clubs and not-for-profits

    • sharing, caring, collaborative services, strong volunteer groups

31. Support the development of new housing stock to address the needs and financial realities of a wide range of users, especially seniors and youth

    • Portland is home to young and old; see #10, #11, #25
    • More Affordable Housing for families and seniors
    • Graduated retirement facility (independent and assisted living;
    • Walkable community;
    • integrated transportation links (ability to get to/from Portland without a car)

32. Support the development of ‘flexible’ housing, commercial and institutional building stock that can adapt easily to evolving community needs

    • Other places for people to gather (café, restaurant, park); private money/investment; see #10, #11

How are we doing today?

Vision Part 3: Business and Services

DIVERSIFY AND IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LOCAL BUSINESS

AND SERVICE OFFERINGS

19. Focus non-water/tourism-related commercial

development on Colbourne St. as the “Main

street” and the Highway corridor as appropriate

  • #1, Appropriate scale and built form of new development and infill
  • #3,“Portland’s future continues to be linked to the lake”; improved harbour facilities; better public access; larger park, more green space; more Hannah Park-type community spaces on prime
    waterfront views; boardwalk; pier at Hannah
    Park; lakefront interpretive centre (boat building
  • #12 ,Commercial development limited and built in Victorian style; Township offices at entrance to Portland; Moroni’s property becomes Township office and library; Portland & Area Heritage Society informed and involved in evolution of Portland; retaining or repurposing the Anglican church; Gallagher property (community-driven solution, greenspace/park/farmers’ market at pavilion, open air theatre, public use, Gallagher House rebuilt, use for municipal infrastructure, not for Township office)
 

VISION PART 5: UPHOLD THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AS THE FOUNDATION

OF OUR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC WELL-BEING

“Portland as an example of sustainable management of tourism and development”

33. Ensure public investments incorporate leading practices in low-impact design and

support resiliency in a changing climate

  • #5
  • #16

34. Ensure stormwater systems in the village improve environmental performance over time

  • #6.
  • #13
  • #16

35. Recognize the need for a developed/semi-hardened shoreline in the village, but offset impacts through wetland preservation and upland rehabilitation in the wider bay

  • #13
  • #16

36. Support citizens in protecting and enhancing their local groundwater aquifer

  • #16

37. Consider communal or decentralized wastewater systems or individual tertiary

systems as a means to reduce collective nutrient loading near shorelines

  • #6
  • #13
  • #16

38. Support citizens in making investments in environmental, well and septic/wastewater programs through community improvement plans, local improvement charges programs or other methods

  • #6
  • #16

Emmanuel Culture Centre

Vision Part 6: Preserve and Promote Our Heritage and Culture

From the very beginning,  the people of Canada have been explorers, adventurers and immigrants seeking opportunities and freedom, creating a rich heritage for those who followed.  Their stories from the past that shaped the values of our country serve inspire our future.

Portland, the gateway to Big Rideau Lake, was an early settlement along the Rideau. Although land was granted in the area of Portland in 1801, it was not until the early 1820s that a community started to grow in the location of the present day town. An 1818 map shows a trail leading to the location which is named "Old Landing." An 1828 map also shows it as "Old Landing" with more of a substantial road leading to it. Local history credits the first settler on the village site as being Ami Chipman (b.1807, son of Heman Chipman). An 1830 map shows a "small settlement" in this location. The name of the small community was changed to Portland in 1833, in honour of William Henry Cavendish Bentinck, the 3rd Duke of Portland.

Portland remained a centre of commerce through the 1800s, serving the commercial boat traffic that plied the Rideau. The business directory for 1866-67 listed coopers, hotel keepers, store keepers, blacksmiths, wagon makers, mitten makers, a watch maker, a miller, and a dentist. When commercial activity along the Rideau slowed down in the early 1900s, the main activity in Portland became a service centre for local residents (including two large marinas). This remains Portland's raison d'être to this day.

40.  Our goal is to record, tell and celebrate our cultural and historical events and stories that shaped our nation and will shape our future.

41. Our goal is to understand and to teach the importance of the multicultural aspect of our nation, Canada.

Acquire the St. Emmanuel Centre

  • A place to display cultural artifacts, a place to celebrate cultural, historical events and stories

  • A place to preserve and teach historical crafts such as weaving, arts, boatbuilding etc

Vision Part 2: Promote Portland as a world-class tourism node on the Rideau System

Note: promotion is a capability which is essential to every element of the Vision for the community.  Therefore a Promotion Team is established to provide the resources required to "support" each of the vision objectives.

13. Invest in waterfront connections/public space

  • The lake is healthy and enjoyed; sailing race; Skate-the-Lake is successful heritage event; see #3

14. Support tourism services already established, such as marinas and short-stay accommodations

  • Improved bylaws to support small business; local investors, invest locally; better presentation of government dock and seasonal parking, see #9

15. Identify gaps in tourism services and foster them through investment attraction and Community Improvement Plan (CIP) incentives

  • Accommodation for tourists/visitors; small hotel (15-30 rooms); B&Bs; restaurant visible from highway and open year-round; ice cream shop; café

16. Support the ecological and recreational welfare of Big Rideau Lake and the Rideau system

  • Environmentally conscious development; maintain, clean and improve environment; monitor and protect water quality along shoreline; plan to reduce climate change; economic development that honours and

    supports our natural assets; local food and labour

17. Support the development of ‘authentic tourism experiences’ focusing on culture, history and the arts

  • Sustainable tourism; honour local heritage; geology centre; arboretum; multiple pollination gardens; value of farming and local food; Emmanuel Center can become a beacon for arts and heritage in the community

18. Support four-season events and tourism offerings

  • Vibrant winter activities; active community (biking, hiking, canoeing, outdoor gatherings and events); waterfront festival; summer and winter special events

Team 6 - Facilities and Services -Part 1: Village Renewal,Public Facilities and Services

Vision Objectives

  1. Appropriate scale and built form of new development and infill
    • “bigger isn’t better”; “much the same, but a bit larger”; no more large buildings/complexes;

    • balanced growth (growth doesn’t hurt village feel or harm environment);

    • heritage buildings maintained;

    • beautiful buildings restored and

      constructed; municipal and big businesses on

      Hwy 15;

    • any new development is low density.
  2. Streetscape renewal
    • Street redevelopment; improved streetscape to attract visitors; enforced/improved property standards

  3. Waterfront connections/public space

    • “Portland’s future continues to be linked to the lake”; improved harbour facilities; better public access; larger park, more green space; more Hannah Park-type community spaces on prime waterfront views; boardwalk; pier at Hannah Park; lakefront interpretive centre (boat building)

  4. Responsive to community needs

    • See #3, 6, 9, 10, 11

  5. Low-impact design (LID) principles
    • See #6, #13, #16

  6. Wastewater servicing innovation

    • Long-term plan for proper infrastructure;

      adequate municipal water, sewer and septic

      system

  7. Adaptive use of structures
    • See#1
  8. Façade improvement of existing commercial stock

    • See #2
  9. Priority to local services, tourism services and

    attractions/investments

    • Improved municipal facilities:
      • Library
      • Community Centre
      • Visitor's Centre
      • Active hall,
      • Current Hall maintained
      • High speed internet access
  10. Appropriate range of housing types and

    affordability

    • More affordable housing for families and seniors

  11. Accessible public facilities and streets to facilitate “aging in place”

  12. New development incorporating heritage, local vernacular or complementary modern design elements

     

    • Commercial development limited and built in

      Victorian style;

    • Township offices at entrance to Portland;

    • Moroni’s property becomes Township office and library;

    • Portland & Area Heritage Society informed and involved in evolution of

      Portland;

    • retaining or repurposing the Anglican

      church;

    • Gallagher property (community-driven

      solution, greenspace/park/farmers’ market at

      pavilion, open air theatre, public use, Gallagher

      House rebuilt, use for municipal infrastructure,

      not for Township office)